Old Andado Station

We were told by a traveller at Dalhousie that the road up to Old Andado was really good and they had gone at 70-80kms an hour but you could go even faster. There are two ways to Old Andado, one is up the Binns Track, the other is via Charlotte Waters and New Crown. One is longer in kms and one has large sections of bull dust, lots of them. Only one of them allows you to get over 60kms hrs. We did both.

The Binns track has large sections of bull dust like we have never seen before, we could see in the mirrors the amount of bull dust being dumped on the Ute, the road does improve in the second half but is still very dusty. When we got to Old Andado and opened the back doors and saw the red dust sitting on the fridge and other areas we decided we would go back the longer route. Just as well we like to take different routes when we can.

The camping area was pretty dusty so we elected not to camp here. There are several fire pits and a camp kitchen. But for those interested it was $10 pp and that included hot showers. You can also pay just to have a shower.

As you approach the front gate of the house there is an information board that starts of saying “Imagine living in a house with no closed in veranda’s, no windows, no flyscreen and no doors. The temperatures in summer can escalate to over 50 degrees …… no plumbing, no power, kerosene lanterns for lighting and fridge’s, wood stove cooked the food and boiled the water ” There is no doubt the conditions were harsh, when Kate was younger living with her parents we lived in the bush and built a house out of flitches that had no windows, doors, flyscreens, no plumbing, we used kerosene lanterns and even had a kerosene fridge, we also had a wood stove that we cooked on and heated the water. The wind used to howl through the windows over our beds. Thankfully we didn’t have the 50 degree heat, or the dry conditions, we did have the snakes and mice.

The difference between Old Andado and other old places we have seen is this place is not set up like a museum, this is someone’s home, who just walked out and left it the way it was for others to see and appreciate the way life was. Donations are asked for and if you do visit I think you will find you are more than happy to donate a few dollars to help keep the place going. It was very interesting and bigger than we expected.

Anotherr traveller who knew Molly personally told us a few fascinating stories about Molly, one was how she started off training as a nurse and due to ill health at the time had to stop her nursing. She so wished to be a nurse. Another story was Molly opened the kitchen cupboard one day to find a brown snake in there. She got the shot gun and shot the snake putting a hole in the back of the cupboard. When Molly and her husband first built the place they had a bad sand storm and ended up with meters of high sand in the house they had to cart out with wheelbarrows. The caretaker is also filled with stories about Molly. Molly sounded like a read character.

The road through New Crown was a better road, through several closed gates and cow paddocks. You could get a bit more speed up on this road, it was still dusty and a few areas of bull dust as most of the roads out this way are.

We decided to head back to Dalhousie and camp at the springs campground and then have a dip in the warm waters after tea, which we did and it was lovely.

Blood Creek and Federal Station

We have been up to watch every sunrise since we have been in the desert. My friend would be proud, just don’t tell her it rises later over here 😛 We had a big day ahead of us and wanted the option of being able to camp on route so we packed everything up and headed off early. We have also divided the day into 3 posts otherwise it would be too long.

We knew from past experience that the road to Mt Dare was pretty rough, several other people confirmed this at Dalhousie and suggested we take the road that leads past Blood Creek and Federal Station. We were considering going past them anyway so if it was a better road then that sealed the deal, only 13km longer.

All that is left of Federal is the old stock yards.

At Blood Creek the old windmill is still standing and turning next to an old well and some old water tanks.

Dalhousie

We were up early and on the road by 9am wanting to be at Dalhousie for lunch.

The small section of the French Line we went on had much smaller sandhills than we had been on the day before but they were far more chopped up. Some big holes in the dunes.

We made Purni Bore by morning tea, we had planned to stop there but it was packed with bikes so we just went up the road and had a cuppa.

The Spring Creek Delta Bypass Track from Purni Bore to Dalhousie is a shocker. Some parts were gravel, some very rocky, rutted, then there would be a big area of sand that would also be corrugated or chopped up or both. There were a few clay pans that were smooth. Then it would be back to the rough stuff.

We were glad to get into Dalhousie but were reminded we have to do that section again in a few days.

Yah, hip hip hurray we made it 🙂 we crossed the Simpson and the Ute did great. We celebrated by having lunch and a good soak in the Dalhousie springs to get rid of the dust from the last few days.

It was a warm day and it would have been nice to dip the feet into some cool water instead the waters of Dalhousie were rather warm in fact too warm. Still it was nice to soak the cares of the day away for a short time before we got too hot and had to hop out.

We dropped our rubbish from the last few days at the rubbish disposal on the way to 3 O’Clock Creek. We figured we could have stayed at the campground at Dalhousie as there weren’t a lot of people there but decided we would go to 3 O’Clock Creek.

The area is mostly rocky but we did find a few smooth flat areas we could make camp. There is a water tower to fill up tanks which we have already seen a few doing.

There wasn’t a lot of flies on the desert but they are out and about here driving us nuts.